Articles of Interest

Heather Power, Owner & Certified Contact Lens Optician K. Heather Power
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Online Purchases Can Place Your Vision At Risk (6)

Safety of Eyeglasses Ordered Online is Questioned - Optometry (October 25, 2011) - In the United States, a joint study conducted by the American Optometric Association, the Optical Laboratories Association, and The Vision Council questions the safety of prescription eyeglasses ordered online.

Opticians Council Of Canada Urges Trick Or Treaters To See Halloween Safely - Opticians Council of Canada (October 18, 2011) - The Opticians Council of Canada (OCC) urges consumers to make careful, educated choices when considering cosmetic contact lenses (non-corrective coloured lenses) for their Halloween costumes. "Improper lenses can lead to allergic reaction, infection, swelling of the cornea, and even blindness," says Robert Dalton, Executive Director of the Opticians Association of Canada. "Severe eye infections have been reported in as little as 24 hours, and some of this damage can be difficult to treat or repair."

Safety and compliance of prescription spectacles ordered by the public via the Internet - Elsevier Health (07/2011) - This study investigated prescription spectacles ordered from online vendors and delivered directly to the public for compliance with the optical tolerance and impact resistance requirements for eyewear dispensed in the United States. Nearly half of prescription spectacles delivered directly by online vendors did not meet either the optical requirements of the patient's visual needs or the physical requirements for the patient's safety.   read more  

Safety of Eyeglasses Ordered Online is Questioned - Optometry (October 25, 2011) - In the United States, a joint study conducted by the American Optometric Association, the Optical Laboratories Association, and The Vision Council questions the safety of prescription eyeglasses ordered online.

Opticians Council Of Canada Urges Trick Or Treaters To See Halloween Safely - Opticians Council of Canada (October 18, 2011) - The Opticians Council of Canada (OCC) urges consumers to make careful, educated choices when considering cosmetic contact lenses (non-corrective coloured lenses) for their Halloween costumes. "Improper lenses can lead to allergic reaction, infection, swelling of the cornea, and even blindness," says Robert Dalton, Executive Director of the Opticians Association of Canada. "Severe eye infections have been reported in as little as 24 hours, and some of this damage can be difficult to treat or repair."

Contact Lenses, Glasses And Children - (07/30/2010) - An FDA-study published on July 26 in Pediatrics titled "Emergency Department Visits for Medical Device-Associated Adverse Events Among Children" has brought to light the alarming rate of ER visits linked to contact lens injuries such as infections and abrasions.   read more  

General Topics (37)

Preventing Eye Injuries - AllAboutVision.com (October 26, 2017) - Experts say more than 90 percent of eye injuries can be prevented by simply taking a few precautions and wearing safety glasses.   read more  

Blue Eyes: Is Everyone With Blue Eyes Related? - AllAboutVision.com (October 26, 2017) - Interesting facts about blue eyes and risks associated with having them.   read more  

Five Most Frequently-Asked Vision Science Questions - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (July 31, 2017) - The FFB answer some of the most frequently asked questions about vision research and emerging treatments.   read more  

Nutrition For Healthy Eyes - AllAboutVision.com (March, 2017) - Research suggests that antioxidants and other important nutrients may reduce your risk of cataracts and macular degeneration. Specific antioxidants can have additional benefits as well. For example, vitamin A protects against blindness, vitamin C may play a role in preventing or alleviating glaucoma, and Omega-3 essential fatty acids appear to help the eye in a variety of ways, from alleviating symptoms of dry eye syndrome to guarding against macular damage.   read more  

Surprising Cell Transplantation Discovery Redirects Race to Restore Sight - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (December 14, 2016) - The FFB answer some of the most frequently asked questions about vision research and emerging treatments.   read more  

Dr. Robert Molday to be the first Canadian to receive CNIB Chanchlani Global Vision Research Award - CNIB Canada (November 9, 2016) - The first Canadian to receive this prestigious award, Dr. Molday is a faculty member at the University of British Columbia where he currently holds positions as Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and is the founding Director of the Centre for Macular Research. He is being recognized for his important and fundamental contributions to the field of vision and inherited retinal degenerative diseases.   read more  

CooperVision Unveils Biofinity Energys™ Contact Lenses Specifically Designed for Today's Digital World - Business Wire (June 29, 2016) - CooperVision announced the introduction of Biofinity Energys™ with Digital Zone Optics™ lens design, pioneering contact lenses specifically created from the ground up for millions of digital device users. Biofinity Energys™ combines breakthrough optical properties, a moisture-retaining material and a smooth, naturally wettable surface for long-lasting comfort.   read more  

A Guide To Children's Vision Problems - AllAboutVision.com (June 2016]) - Early detection of children's vision problems is essential to make sure your kids have the visual skills they need to do well in school, sports and other activities. Vision is arguably the most important of the five senses. It plays a crucial role throughout childhood and beyond. In fact, experts say 80 percent of what children learn in school is presented visually. Pets and frequency of eye exams are also discussed.   read more  

Blue Light Does Not Cause Vision Loss... But Consider a Screen Vacation - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (March 1, 2016) - Blue light is a hot topic. Reports about blue light are popping up in the news and at various vision conferences. Is blue light a problem? No and yes. The answer is complicated, in part, because it's difficult to separate the effects of blue light from the effects of gazing intently at screens for extended periods of time.   read more  

Popular antibiotics to carry new warning about retinal detachment- Vancouver Sun (02/03/2016) - Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed for respiratory and urinary infections. They will now carry a warning label after Health Canada completed a second review of reports that some patients using them had suffered retinal detachment.   read more  

CRISPR Gene-editing Technology Repairs Retinitis Pigmentosa in Patient-Derived Stem Cells- Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (January 29, 2016) - The latest discovery using the gene editing tool CRISPR shows that it can repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This is an inherited degenerative eye disease that causes blindness in 1.5 million people around the world. A study published in Scientific Reports, broke new ground because it was the first time that researchers were able to replace a defective gene in stem cells that were derived from a patient's own tissue.   read more  

How Do Stem Cells Become Eye Cells? - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (January 26, 2016) - Stem cells have the potential to become any kind of cell. This flexibility is what makes them so intriguing to medical scientists who hope to harness this potential to generate new cell therapies. However, there are two very difficult questions that continue to challenge scientists. First, how do you get stem cells to make the exact cell type that you need, such as a light-sensing photoreceptor? And second, how do you get these new replacement cells to function inside human bodies?   read more  

Teens and Contact Lenses: What Parents Need to Know - AllAboutVision.com (January, 2016) - A guide on preparing yourself and your teenager for a contact lens fitting. What every parent needs to know.   read more  

Survey Finds Poor Vision, Hearing Loss in Adolescents- Info Clip (June 24, 2015) - A recent survey of French adolescents has found that visual and auditory health problems are increasingly common, even though only a quarter of the teens surveyed reported being concerned about their own health. 44% of adolescents aged 13 to 18 had experienced eye strain or dry eye.   read more  

Waterloo Student Wins $100,000 Grant to Develop Smart Contact Lenses- Info Clip (June 19 2015) - The Thiel Foundation announced last week that its class of 2015 Thiel Fellows includes University of Waterloo student Harry Gandhi, co-founder and CEO of Medella Health, a Canadian start-up which plans to develop glucose-monitoring "smart" contact lenses to aid in diabetes management.   read more  

Regrowing Corneal Cells From Teeth - Info Clip (April 9, 2015) - Pittsburgh University researchers have succeeded in transforming stem cells from wisdom teeth into corneal cells in mice. These cells could be used to repair corneal scarring and offer a potential future treatment for corneal blindness, a condition affecting millions worldwide.   read more  

Say Goodbye to Google Glass... for Now- Info Clip (January 26, 2015) - The Glass Explorer Program, launched in 2013, ended January 19, when Google closed the sale of its wearable prototypes.   read more  

Health Canada Approves First 'Bionic Eye'- Info Clip (January 19, 2015) - The Argus II is the first retinal prosthesis system of its kind to be approved by Health Canada from Second Sight Medical Products. The "bionic eye" is used for treating outer retinal degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) blindness.   read more  

Glasses For People With Red-Green Colour-Blindness - Scientific American (February 18, 2013) - American neurobiologist Mark Changizi has developed eyewear (marketed under the name Oxy-Iso) that corrects colour-blindness and clearly enhances colour vision.

Contact Lenses Play The Role Of Sterile Dressing - Russian Radio (Jan 24, 2013) - A new type of therapeutic soft contact lenses developed in Russia by Liomed could soon greatly contribute to healing eye burns. The new lens would act like a unique dressing and could be applied immediately after the injury occurs.

EyeRing: A "Camera-Ring" That Could Help The Visually Impaired - MIT (September 27, 2012) - Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have conceived a new original tool that could ease the life of visually impaired people: the EyeRing. It is a wearable intuitive interface that allows people to point at an object to see or hear more information about it.

Eye-Tracking Could Aid in Diagnosis of Neurological Disorders - Journal of Neurology (September 17, 2012) - Researchers claim that because attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) each involve attention and ocular control dysfunctions, they can be easily identified through an evaluation of how patients move their eyes while they watch television.

Alzheimer's Could Be Diagnosed By An Eye Tracking Test - Journal of the American Aging Association (September 11, 2012) - A new research led by Lancaster University has shown that people with Alzheimer's disease have difficulty with one specific type of eye tracking test.

Communicating With One'S Eyes, Literally - Current Biology (July 26, 2012) - An international team led by researchers from the Centre de recherche de l'institut du cerveau et de la moelle epiniere (CNRS/Inserm/UPMC) has succeeded in enhancing the visual abilities of a group of healthy subjects using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

The Younger You Are The Sicker 3D Movie Viewing Makes You - Optometry and Vision Science (July, 2012) - Symptoms related to 3D viewing are affected by where you sit while watching, and even how old you are; younger viewers incurred higher immersion but also greater visual and motion sickness symptoms in 3D viewing, according to a new study.

New Eye Test To Detect The Risk Of Stroke - Ophthalmology (June, 2012) - A new test developed by researchers from the University of Zurich can determine which patients are at risk for a stroke. The team of researchers used a device called the dynamic contour tonometer to measure the ocular impulse amplitude of 67 patients who were assumed to have carotid artery stenosis.

Mnemosline: Eyewear That Improves Memory - Info Clip (May 31, 2012) - Eyewear called Mnemosline that stimulate alpha brain waves and improve memory are the outcome of 10 years' research by Francesco Ferro Milone. Instead of lenses, the glasses have two red LEDs with light impulses that increase alpha wave activity to help memory recovery.

Wear Eyeglasses To Lose Weight! - Info Clip (May 4, 2012) - Researchers at Tokyo University have invented eyewear that change the size of food, to help dieters feel fuller faster by giving the appearance of eating more.

Osteoporosis Drug Increases Risk Of Eye Disease - Canadian Medical Association Journal (April 23, 2012) - According to an article published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, oral bisphosphonates, the drug commonly prescribed to prevent osteoporosis, increases the risk of developing inflammatory ocular disease.

Retinopathy A Marker for Cognitive Loss - Neurology (March 14, 2012) - Women 65 or older who have even mild retinopathy are more likely to have cognitive decline and related vascular changes in the brain, according to a study led by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco. The findings suggest that a relatively simple eye screening could serve as a marker for cognitive changes related to vascular disease, allowing for early diagnosis and treatment, potentially reducing the progression of cognitive impairment to dementia.

Better Vision Equals Better Grades - Optometry and Vision Science (January, 2012) - Treatment of convergence insufficiency in children can help improve their performance at school, according to a recent study published in the January issue of Optometry and Vision Science.

Baby Boomers Worry About Eye Health but Skip Regular Exams, Ocular Nutrition Society Survey Says - Sight Nation (October 26, 2011) - The National Eye Institute estimates that over the next 30 years, the number of Americans that experience eye health issues will double because of aging baby boomers. Still, although boomers worry about vision loss almost as much as heart disease and cancer, that anxiety does not translate into regular eye exams. In addition, very few are aware that there are some important nutrients that help maintain eye health.

Eyelid Lipid Plaques Could Suggest Cardiovascular Disease - BMJ (September 15, 2011) - If you're seeing lipid-containing yellow plaques-also known as xanthelasmata-on the eyelids, your patient could be looking at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

New Recommendation for Children's Vision Screening - (03/06/2011) - The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended screening for visual impairment in children.

Long-Term Use of Amantadine May Impact Vision - (06/03/2010) - A study published in the June issue of the journal Ophthalmology shows that long-term use of amantadine in patients with Parkinson's disease can significantly reduce endothelial cell density (ECD).   read more  

Lenses That Allow You To Control Your Vision - (03/22/2010) - The lenses are described as a completely new technology of "electronic" lenses that make it possible to auto-focus for near vision at the exact moment the wearer needs it.   read more  

Seeing a Bionic Eye on Medicine's Horizon - (03/22/2010) - Prof. Yael Hanein of Tel Aviv University's School of Electrical Engineering has foundational research that may give sight to blind eyes, merging retinal nerves with electrodes to stimulate cell growth.   read more  

Cancer (2)

Hope For Kids With Retinoblastoma - British Journal of Ophthalmology (July 23, 2012) - A new technique for administering chemotherapy involving the injection of the drug directly into the vitreous is highly promising in the treatment of retinoblastoma in children.

Genetic Secrets of Retinoblastoma Uncovered - ScienceDaily (Jan 16, 2012) - A study published in Nature helped identify the mechanism that makes retinoblastoma - an eye tumour that is found in 5,000 children worldwide each year - so aggressive.

Cataracts (8)

Cataract News - AllAboutVision.com (October 26, 2017) - Read a collection of articles about how cataracts and their removal affect you, how they form, and how smoking affects the risk of their formation. There is a new DNA test that quickly diagnoses the cause of congenital cataracts. Whether IOL or contacts are better for infants after cataract surgery is discussed.   read more  

For Cataract Surgery, Laser is a Bit Better - Review of Optometry (December 29, 2012) - Intuitively, using a femtosecond laser for cataract surgery seems like a safer and better method than using manual instruments. But, because the technology is so new, not much data has been compiled to confirm this, or to quantify any improvement in outcomes. Now, three presentations have provided preliminary outcome measures that showed more predictable cataract surgery results with the femtosecond laser and a few signals of potential improvements for patients.

Cholesterol Meds and Cataract - Optometry and Vision Science (October 17, 2012) - People who take cholesterol-lowering statin drugs have a 57% increased risk for cataracts, according to a new study in Optometry and Vision Science.

Statins May Be Linked to Increased Cataract Risk - Optometry and Vision Science (August 28, 2012) - People using cholesterol-lowering statin drugs may be at increased risk of developing age-related cataracts, according to a new Canadian study.

Femto Laser Cataract Surgery Safe and Effective - Review of Ophthalmology (December 09, 2011) - Two new studies add to the growing body of evidence that femtosecond laser cataract surgery may be safer and more efficient than today's standard procedure.

Less Blue Light, More Trouble Sleeping - Review of Optometry (November 7, 2011) - Reduced blue light transmission to the retina, which results from aging and yellowing of the lens, strongly correlates with sleep disturbance, a recent Danish study suggests. Results revealed that every 1% increase in blue light lens transmission reduced the odds of sleep disturbance by 5%.

Cataract Scorecard Helps Predict Success - Review of Optometry (March 17, 2011) - Although cataract removal is the most common surgery performed in the United States, there is no standard assessment tool to help doctors and health planners decide the best candidates for cataract removal or gauge the expected quality of life improvements post-surgery. A Spanish research team, Investigacion en Resultados de Salud Y Servicios Sanitarios (IRYSS) Cataract Group, seeks to change that with the development of such a universal tool.   read more  

Caffeine May Help Prevent Cataract Formation - (06/05/2010) - Caffeine may be effective in protecting the lens against damage that could lead to the formation of cataracts, according to a study presented on May 4 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.   read more  

Dry Eye & Lid Conditions (13)

Nutrition For Healthy Eyes - AllAboutVision.com (March 2017) - Omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent macular degeneration (AMD) and dry eyes. Vitamin A may protect against night blindness and dry eyes.   read more  

The Science And Art Of Blinking - National Keratoconus Foundation - Blinking cleans the ocular surface of debris (cellular, dried tears, and the junk that blows in with the wind) and flushes fresh tears over the ocular surface. This brings nutrients and other substances to the surface structures keeping them healthy. It helps prevent infection and clears and brightens the image received by our retina. It wets the outer eye and in the case of the contact lens wearer, replenishes the tear layer upon which the contact lens floats.   read more  

CooperVision Unveils Biofinity Energys™ Contact Lenses Specifically Designed for Today's Digital World - Business Wire (June 29, 2016) - CooperVision announced the introduction of Biofinity Energys™ with Digital Zone Optics™ lens design, pioneering contact lenses specifically created from the ground up for millions of digital device users. Biofinity Energys™ combines breakthrough optical properties, a moisture-retaining material and a smooth, naturally wettable surface for long-lasting comfort. Seven in ten adults experience discomfort that comes with long hours of digital device use, yet the widespread condition is often dismissed as "normal" by a population that has become accustomed to a digital lifestyle.   read more  

Australian Research: Contact Lens Discomfort Not Linked to General Eye Fatigue - Info Clip (August 19, 2015) - Discomfort and dry eyes are the major causes of patient dissatisfaction with contact lenses, and often contact lens practitioners will suggest switching to disposable lenses to improve performance, however research from the University of New South Wales, Australia funded by CIBA Vision and the Brien Holden Vision Institute, shows that simply reducing the length of time the patient is wearing contact lenses results in a large improvement in comfort and dryness.   read more  

New Discovery About Blink Rates - Info Clip (June 26, 2015) - Wide-diameter scleral lenses help relieve symptoms of dry eyes, according to the director of the contact lens service of Loyola University Health System, in Illinois.   read more  

A real tear-jerker: Team creates device to alleviate dry eye - Stanford Medical (January 23, 2015) - A search for medical needs in eye clinics led Stanford Biodesign fellows to develop an implantable neurostimulator that painlessly increases natural tear production.   read more  

Antibiotics Relieve Symptoms of MGD - Review of Ophthalmology (March 1, 2013) - A study from Kentucky suggests that the signs and symptoms of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), improve after therapy with topical azithromycin ophthalmic solution and oral doxycycline treatment.

Omega-3 Supplements Can Help Ocular Comfort - Brien Holden Vision Institute (November 6, 2012) - Omega-3 supplements are already known for their many preventive effects. Researchers from the Brien Holden Vision Institute, in Australia, have now found that the supplements significantly improved ocular comfort with and without contact lenses, both in the morning and evening, when ocular discomfort tends to be greater.

Measuring Eyelid Sensitivity May Help to Identify the Causes of Dry Eyes - Optometry & Vision Science (October 11, 2012) - A simple test of eyelid sensitivity may help eyecare professionals in evaluating symptoms of dry eyes. Indeed, increased eyelid sensitivity could be linked to decreased function of the eyelid margins, according to a new study published in Optometry and Vision Science.

Scleral Lenses Provide Relief for Dry Eyes - Science Daily (April 10, 2012) - Wide-diameter scleral lenses help relieve symptoms of dry eyes, according to the director of the contact lens service of Loyola University Health System, in Illinois.   read more  

Good News for Coffee Drinkers - (May 3, 2012) - Researchers at the University of Tokyo, in Japan, have shown for the first time that caffeine increases the production of tears, which could help treat dry eye syndrome.

Early Cellular Cause of Dry Eye Disease 'Seen' for the First Time - Science Daily (June 1, 2011) - If you are one of the millions of people around the world who struggle with dry eye disease, good news is on the way. A new research discovery published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology offers hope for new drugs that treat the cellular cause of the disease rather than its symptoms. That's because the research is the first to identify natural killer (NK) cells, a type of cell that provides innate immunity to the eyes, as promoting the inflammation that plays a critical role in the development of dry eye disease.   read more  

TheraTears Shown to Reduce Dry-Eye Symptoms - (02/16/2011) - A recent study published in Cornea has revealed a reduction in dry eye symptoms and an increase in tear volume and tear flow for patients taking TheraTears Nutrition, a blend of medical grade essential omega-3 oils, including eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and flaxseed oil.

Keratoconus (15)

Eye Drop Treatment for Keratoconus? - National Keratoconus Foundation (December, 2017) - Iveena Delivery Systems, a Salt Lake City-based biotech, was awarded a $225,000 grant from the National Eye Institute to expand their research into a topical treatment for keratoconus. Dr. Bala Ambati, MD wondered if there might be a way to formulate an eye-drop that would have the same effect as corneal crosslinking. The result, he reasoned, would be a non-invasive, relatively cost effective, topical therapy for treatment of keratoconus.   read more  

AEVR in Action - NAEVR (November 7, 2017) - AEVR hosted the first ever World Keratoconus (KC) Day congressional briefing, which featured research into novel treatments. KC is not a rare disease, as was once thought. With improved testing, it now appears that the prevalence-from most-mild to the most-extreme-is 1 in every 400 individuals. Although certain ethnic groups seem to have a higher incidence, especially those from India, Pakistan, Turkey and the Middle East, every nationality and both sexes are equally affected.   read more  

AOA 2017 KC Roundtable - Vimeo (Dec 2017) - A group of panelist from AOA discuss what they do with new keratoconus patients in their practice. (Video)   read more  

Keratoconus World Ambassador Tommy Pham - Vimeo (November 2017) - Tommy Pham of the St. Louis Cardinals talks about living with keratoconus and not letting it stop him from reaching his goals.   read more  

Keratoconus World Ambassador Tommy Pham Part 2 - Vimeo (November 2017) - Watch Part 2 - an extended interview with World KC Day Ambassador, Tommy Pham! Learn more about how living with KC, CXL and Contact lenses has impacted his career.   read more  

KC & Down Syndrome - National Keratoconus Foundation (2017) - Successful CXL on patients with Down Syndrome depends on patient cooperation and proper patient selection.   read more  

Is There a Keratoconus Gene? - National Keratoconus Foundation (2017) - An important paper on the genetics of keratoconus was recently published in the journal Ophthalmic Genetics. Scientists based at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) offered a detailed look at the various genetic analysis techniques in use, and whether they could be successfully applied to finding a genetic basis for KC. The authors wrote that KC appears to be a disease continuum. It appears to have a genetic contribution, combined with environmental factors. Sometimes KC shows the characteristics of monogenic disease; in most cases it appears to be a complex disease. If KC is a continuum, and there are individuals whose disease is the result of a single gene mutation, there are many more individuals at the other end of the spectrum whose disease is caused by environmental factors in combination with a large number of small effect genetic risk factors.   read more  

The Great Debate in CXL: Epi-on Versus Epi-off - EyetubeOD (April 2017) - Some practitioners have raised clinical concerns regarding epithelial removal in the CXL procedure, primarily due to its association with adverse events such as postoperative pain, delayed visual recovery, microbial infections, corneal haze, corneal scarring, and loss of visual acuity. The debate continues.   read more  

Crosslinking in Children and Teenagers - National Keratoconus Foundation 2017 - Recent articles have analyzed cornea crosslinking (CXL) in the pediatric population. When the procedure was first described fourteen years ago, the treatment was reserved for adults with progressive keratoconus. After CXL was found to be safe and effective, doctors questioned if the procedure could also help teenagers with keratoconus and began to treat this population. The authors caution that CXL is performed to stabilize the cornea, rather than to improve vision or flatten the cornea permanently. By that metric, the procedure is successful, although it appears that in some cases, keratoconus will progress after a period of stability.   read more  

Family Ties - National Keratoconus Foundation 2016 - About half of the children of a person with KC may inherit the gene. Of those who carry the gene, a smaller subset will actually develop the disorder. And since the severity of the disease varies, it is possible that many people go through life without knowing they have KC. They simply believe they need eyeglasses or contact lenses to correct their vision abnormalities.   read more  

Keratoconus & Obstructive Sleep Apnea - National Keratoconus Foundation 2015 - People living with keratoconus may attribute symptoms of weariness to their vision problems, but researchers have identified a connection between keratoconus and obstructive sleep apnea.   read more  

The Science And Art Of Blinking - National Keratoconus Foundation - Blinking cleans the ocular surface of debris and flushes fresh tears over the ocular surface. Each blink brings nutrients to the eye surface structures keeping them healthy. The flow of tears is responsible for wetting the lower third of the cornea. This is very important in KC, since this area is generally below the bulge of the cone and in many cases irritated by wobbly RGP lenses.   read more  

Is It All in the Genes? - Review of Optometry (March 11, 2013) - Optometrists may one day be able to identify patients at high risk for glaucoma and keratoconus based on their genetic profiles, thanks to a discovery by scientists at the Singapore Eye Research Institute and the Association for Science, Technology and Research's Genome Institute of Singapore.

Pregnancy-induced Progression of Keratoconus - Cornea, The Journal of Cornea and External Disease (September 2011) - Purpose: To report eyes with keratoconus that progressed during pregnancy.   read more  

Rare, but Effective: Corneal Transplant Improves Vision and Daily Life for Some Children - American Academy of Opthalmology (03/01/2011) - Teens, children, and even infants sometimes require corneal transplants, although most such surgeries are performed in adults. Australian researchers led by Keryn A. Williams, PhD, tracked transplant success and visual outcomes in 640 young patients who received new corneas between 1985 and 2009.   read more  

LASIK/PRK (3)

New LASIK Glue Sticks - Review of Optometry (October 4, 2012) - A new adhesive composite could improve the long-term postoperative safety of LASIK surgery. Researchers at the University of Kansas have developed a glue mixture of fibrinogen and riboflavin that, when combined with ultraviolet light, could be used to further stabilize the surgically induced corneal flap after LASIK.

A Glue Mixture Could Improve Safety Of Lasik Eye Surgeries - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (September 5, 2012) - Researchers from Kansas State University have developed a glue mixture that may reduce risks after laser vision correction surgery.

Contacts Release Anesthesia to Eyes of Post-Surgery Patients - American Chemical Society's journal Langmuir (January 30, 2012) - Scientists have developed a contact lens that releases anesthesia to the eye for post-surgery pain relief. The contacts can be particularly effective for patients who undergo PRK (photorefractive keratectomy), in which the healing process can take days, weeks or even months.

Myopia Related or Prevention/Reduction (8)

Half of World's Population Will be Short-Sighted by 2050 - Info Clip (February 23, 2016) - There will be 5 billion cases of myopia by 2050, with one-fifth of those cases at increased risk for blindness, according to the Brien Holden Vision Institute. In East Asia alone, the number of myopes is expected to go from 517 million in 2000 to nearly one billion in 2050. The leading causes for the rise in myopia are thought to be environmental, mainly due to the lifestyle changes of increasing urbanization and the greater amount of time children spend indoors at close-range tasks, such as using computers and reading, as well as peripheral hyperopia in the myopic eye (corrected and uncorrected) encouraging axial growth.   read more  

Optometrists Report Increase in Eye Problems Related to Digital Devices - London Free Press (January 26, 2015) - Staring for long periods at small hand-held devices can do more damage to your eyesight than you might think, eye doctors warn. One London teen, after binge-watching her favourite Netflix programs on her smartphone, looked up and realized she couldn't see - her eyesight was so bad, she was almost legally blind.   read more  

Citizen Scientists Look into Nearsightedness - The 23 and Me Research/Blog (February 25, 2013) - While it's been clear that genetics play an important role in nearsightedness, until this month relatively little was known about which genes are involved. Two large studies on nearsightedness, however, have recently shed light on the subject. One of these studies was conducted by the 23andMe research team under the leadership of Amy Kiefer and Nick Eriksson.   read more  

Citizen Scientists Look into Nearsightedness - The 23 and Me Research/Blog (February 25, 2013) - While it's been clear that genetics play an important role in nearsightedness, until this month relatively little was known about which genes are involved. Two large studies on nearsightedness, however, have recently shed light on the subject. One of these studies was conducted by the 23andMe research team under the leadership of Amy Kiefer and Nick Eriksson.   read more  

Time Outdoors is Good for Children's Eyesight - Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (November 5, 2012) - Children who spend more time outdoors are less likely to become short-sighted, according to a research published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

Myopia: It's Not Just the Length - Optometry and Vision Science (May 3, 2012) - A new study finds that myopia develops in children when the crystalline lens stops adapting to the eye's continued growth, according researchers at The Ohio State University College of Optometry.

Genetic Mutation Found for Myopia - Review of Optometry (November 1, 2011) - Researchers have identified a defective gene that causes myopia, the most common human eye disorder. Led by Ohad Birk, M.D., Ph.D., a research group at the Ben-Gurion University of Negev identified the gene in a thorough study of severe, early-onset myopia that is common in a particular Bedouin tribe in southern Israel.

Could Playing Outdoors be an Antidote for Nearsightedness? - American Academy of Ophthalmology (October 26, 2011) - Sending kids outdoors to play may be all it takes to reduce the number of people developing nearsightedness, a condition that is increasingly common on every continent.

Retina - Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) (39)

Baby Boomers Less at Risk for AMD as They Age Than Previous Generations - Info Clip (November 28, 2017) - A large population-based study has found that the incidence of AMD has drastically declined with each generation. When adjusting for age and sex, each generation was 60% less likely to develop AMD compared to the generation previous. The 5-year age-adjusted risk for the Greatest Generation (people born 1901-1924) was 8.8%, for the Silent Generation (born 1925-1945) 3.3%, and for Baby Boomers (1946-1964) just 1.0%. The age-adjusted 5-year risk for Generation X (born 1965-1984) was just 0.3%. The decline in risk remained significant even when controlling for known AMD-risk factors such as smoking and cholesterol level.   read more  

Myths About AMD - Vimeo (November, 2017) - Dr. Beowne discusses some of the common misconceptions about AMD, that may originate on the internet, or even stories you hear on the streets. Stay tuned as Dr. Browne goes through these misconceptions.   read more  

Importance of Leutin and Zeaxanthin For the Eyes - Vimeo (October, 2017) - Dr. Browne shows us the importance of Lutein and Zeaxanthin as vitamins for the eyes.   read more  

AMD Awareness Video - Vimeo (September, 2017) - Video   read more  

Halting Cell Death to Save Vision - Foundation Fighting Blindness (April 3, 2017) - Many forms of vision loss, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), are a result of the death of cells. In these and similar diseases, the culprit is a specific set of cells housed in the retina called photoreceptors. These cells enable the eye to capture light, and without them vision is lost. The cutting-edge approach being developed in Dr. Monnier's lab involves preventing the death of these precious cells. He and his team are exploring the possibility of halting photoreceptor cell death to save vision.   read more  

Microbes in Your Gut Influence Major Eye Disease - University of Montreal Nouvelles (November 15, 2016) - Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the industrialized world, affecting over 10 million individuals in North America. A study lead by Dr. Przemyslaw (Mike) Sapieha, researcher at Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont (CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Ile-de-Montreal) and professor at the University of Montreal, published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, uncovered that bacteria in your intestines may play an important role in determining if you will develop blinding wet AMD.   read more  

One Step Closer To A "Smart" Stem Cell Therapy - Foundation Fighting Blindness (August 16, 2016) - Dr. Nagy is famous for making multiple major breakthroughs in regenerative medicine. First, he developed a technique to create stem cells from other cells of the body. Next, he developed a technique that manipulates how cells express different molecules. Last year, Dr. Nagy was awarded funding from the Foundation Fighting Blindness for his project that combines these techniques to develop a new "smart" stem cell therapy for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 50.   read more  

International Study Reveals New Genetic Clues to Age-Related Macular Degeneration - National Eye Institute (December 21, 2015) - An international study of about 43,000 people has significantly expanded the number of genetic factors known to play a role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss among people age 50 and older. Supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, the findings may help improve our understanding of the biological processes that lead to AMD and identify new therapeutic targets for potential drug development. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic, environmental and lifestyle risk factors. For example, smoking increases the risk of AMD, while eating leafy greens and fish, such as salmon, halibut, and tuna, may reduce the risk. Up to this point, researchers had identified 21 regions of the genome-called loci-that influence the risk of AMD. The new research, published in Nature Genetics, brings the number up to 34 loci.   read more  

4 Out of 10 Canadians Are Unfamiliar With AMD - Info Clip (May 13, 2015) - Vision health is important to Canadians, but they don't do what's necessary to save their sight. This is the conclusion of the National Vision Health Report, commissioned by Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) and published during the 2015 Vision Health Month. The study found that 92% of respondents believe that eye exams are important, however, almost one out of every four respondents has not had their eyes examined in the last two years. In addition, 40% of respondents do not know what AMD is and less than half of respondents know their family history of eye disease.   read more  

Telescopic contact lenses and wink-control glasses - Science Daily (February 13, 2015) - Optics specialist Eric Tremblay from EPFL in Switzerland unveils the latest prototype in a telescopic contact lens and debuts accessory wink-controlled glasses that switch between normal and 2.8x magnified vision.   read more  

LASER 1, AMD 0 - Info Clip (February 13, 2015) - A new laser treatment administered during early stages of age-related macular degeneration may slow, even reverse, the progression of the disease.   read more  

Macular Degeneration News - AllAboutVision.com (October 26, 2017) - Three articles regarding 3 risk factors for developing AMD (smoking, blood pressure drugs and UV light exposure), as well as a new test for AMD, and it may soon be possible to treat macular degeneration with eye drops rather than eye injections.   read more  

Genes Linked To The Development Of AMD, But Not To Its Treatment - American Academy of Ophthalmology (April 18, 2013) - The four gene variants linked to the development of AMD do not influence how patients respond to treatment using Lucentis and Avastin.

Rosemary's Component Could Protect Against Macular Degeneration - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (December 6, 2012) - Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute found that carnosic acid, a component of rosemary, protects retinas from degeneration and toxicity.

First Transplant of Neural Stem Cells In Dry AMD Trial - Review of Ophthalmology (December 3, 2012) - StemCells Inc. announced that the first patient in its Phase I/II clinical trial in dry age-related macular degeneration has been enrolled and transplanted.

A New Promising Molecule - Nature Communications (November 27, 2012) - Scientists at the University of Illinois have designed a light-sensitive molecule that can stimulate a neural response in cells of the retina and brain. Their results may be a possible first step to overcoming degenerative eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration.

World's First Bionic Eye Implant is a Success - Review of Optometry (October 3, 2012) - Researchers in Australia made history last month after confirming the first successful "bionic eye" implant in the world. Scientists at Bionic Vision Australia (BVA) surgically implanted a prototype of the bionic eye in 54-year-old Dianne Ashworth, who suffers vision loss due to retinitis pigmentosa.

New Cells Found That Could Help To Treat Blinding Eye Conditions - British Journal for Ophthalmology (September 5, 2012) - Specific cells in the eye called corneal limbal stromal cells have been discovered and could lead to new treatments for eye conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa or wet AMD.

A Micro Option for Ocular Injection - Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (August 10, 2012) - Microneedles may soon provide a better way to administer injections to treat diseases such as macular degeneration. For the first time, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University have demonstrated that microneedles less than a millimeter in length can deliver drug molecules and particles to the eye in an animal model.

Chemical Temporarily Reverses Blindness in Mouse Model - Neuron (July 25, 2012) - A team of University of California, Berkeley, scientists in collaboration with researchers at the University of Munich and University of Washington in Seattle has discovered a chemical that temporarily restores some vision to blind mice, and is working on an improved compound that may someday allow people with degenerative blindness to see again. The approach could eventually help those with retinitis pigmentosa, as well as age-related macular degeneration. In both diseases, rods and cones die, leaving the eye without functional photoreceptors.

AMD Linked to Increased Stroke Risk - Review of Optometry (June 11, 2012) - Patients with age-related macular degeneration are at an increased risk for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study in the April 24 online version of Stroke.

DHA Supplementation Prevents The Accumulation Of A Toxic Molecule In The Retina - University of Alberta (June 11, 2012) - A new study from the University of Alberta has found that DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, prevented the accumulation of a toxic molecule that normally builds up at the back of the eyes with age and causes vision loss.

New Found Hope For Some Patients With AMD - Association for Research in Vision & Ophthalmology (ARVO) (May 16, 2012) - An oral nutraceutical could restore vision to patients with macular degeneration for whom conventional treatments have failed to stop the growth of abnormal blood vessels.

Genes That Speak Volumes - Genome Medicine (March 15, 2012) - Measuring the expression levels in certain genes would help identify patients with age-related macular degeneration, as well as distinguish AMD subtypes.

AMD and Sleep Apnea Don'T Mix Well - Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 2012 Annual Meeting (May 8, 2012) - Patients with AMD who do not respond to anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) treatment may have untreated obstructive sleep apnea, according to a study released at the recent ARVO Annual Meeting.

AMD and Stem Cells - ECP Magazine (March 3, 2012) - Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition which usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field. Central vision is provided by the macula. The degeneration of the macula is caused by slow sustained death of the cone cells contained within the macula. It is a major cause of blindness and visual impairment in older adults greater than 50 years of age. In recent medical news, there may be areas of hope for macular degeneration patients using stem cell therapy.   read more  

What If Vitamin D Kept Us Young? - Neurobiology of Aging (February 9, 2012) - According to British researchers, vitamin D could reduce the effects of aging on the eyes and vision.

Human Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for Retinal Diseases - Lancet (January 24, 2012) - A therapy derived from human embryonic stem cells that was used to treat two visually devastating retinal conditions appears to be both safe and effective, according to a novel study in the January 23 online version of Lancet.

Risk Of Blindness Halved Over Last Decade - American Journal of Ophthalmology (January 23, 2012) - A report from the University of Copenhagen and Glostrup Hospital in Denmark demonstrates the success of injections to fight vision loss due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The number of new cases of blindness and severe visual loss in Denmark has been halved during the last ten years.   read more  

Flexible Adult Stem Cells, Right There in Your Eye - Cell Stem Cell (January 20, 2012) - In the future, patients in need of perfectly matched neural stem cells may not need to look any further than their own eyes. Researchers reporting in the January issue of Cell Stem Cell, a Cell Press publication, have identified adult stem cells of the central nervous system in a single layer of cells at the back of the eye.

Aspirin Use Associated With Development Of AMD - Info Clip (January 9, 2012) - According to a recent European study, people over the age of 65 who take aspirin daily may double their risk of developing the "wet" form of age-related macular degeneration.

Using Avastin In The Eye Is Risky - Info Clip (December 14, 2011) - Hoffmann-La Roche and Health Canada recently released another statement regarding the hazards of intravitreal injection of Avastin® (bevacizumab), a drug approved for intravenous use in the treatment of certain cancers.

Nanoparticles Help Researchers Deliver Steroids to Retina - Biomaterials (December 13, 2011) - Hitching a ride into the retina on nanoparticles called dendrimers offers a new way to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

Study Estimates Potential for Ranibizumab to Prevent Blindness from Age-Related Macular Degeneration - Science Daily (June 15, 2011) - A computer modeling study suggests that administering the drug ranibizumab is associated with reducing the magnitude of legal blindness and visual impairment caused by age-related macular degeneration in non-Hispanic white individuals, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.   read more  

Two Tiny Molecules Cause Enormous Problems - Science Daily (June 7, 2011) - Blocking two tiny molecules of RNA -- a chemical cousin of DNA -- appears to suppress the abnormal growth of blood vessels that occurs in degenerative eye disorders, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.   read more  

Changing Vitamin A To Treat Eye Diseases - Science Daily (May 18, 2011) - Slowing down the aggregation or "clumping" of vitamin A in the eye may help prevent vision loss caused by macular degeneration, research from Columbia University Medical Center has found.   read more  

New Breakthrough In Use Of Stem Cells For Restoring Vision - ScienceDaily (May 16, 2011) - Scientists from Schepens Eye Research Institute are the first to regenerate large areas of damaged retinas and improve visual function using IPS cells (induced pluripotent stem cells) derived from skin. The results of their study, which is published in PLoS ONE this month, hold great promise for future treatments and cures for diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy and other retinal diseases that affect millions worldwide.   read more  

AMD on the Decline in U.S. - (02/14/2011) - The percentage of people with age-related macular degeneration has dropped more than 30% in 15 years, according study published in the January issue of Archives of Ophthalmology. One possible reason: Fewer people are smoking cigarettes, a known cause of eye disease.

VisionCare's Macular Degeneration Telescope Implant Named 'Best of What's New' 2010 by Popular Science - (11/16/2010) - VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies, Inc., a developer of advanced visual prosthetic devices, today announced the Implantable Miniature Telescope (by Dr. Isaac Lipshitz), designed to improve vision in patients with end-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD).   read more  

Retina - Glaucoma (17)

Gene Behind Glaucoma Identified - AllAboutVision.com (October 26, 2017) - The following articles are listed. New Device Lets You Test Your Eye Pressure Every Day - At Home, Research Says You Should Rethink Your Yoga Routine if You Have Glaucoma, People's Gait May Reveal Whether They Have Glaucoma, Glaucoma Drug and Weight Loss Program Combined to Battle Blinding Disorder, Marijuana Is Not Effective as a Glaucoma Treatment, Study Finds Sleeping With Head Elevated Reduces IOP, Low Vitamin D Might Be Risk Factor for Glaucoma, Sleeping on One Side May Worsen Glaucoma, Likelihood of Blindness From Glaucoma Has Dropped by Nearly Half   read more  

10 things you should know about glaucoma - National Eye Institute (January 6, 2017) - Tips and facts about the second leading cause of blindness   read more  

New Micro-Scale Glaucoma Device May Be Used as a Standalone Procedure or in Combination with Cataract Surgery - Business Wire (August 10, 2015) - Glaukos Corporation (NYSE: GKOS), an ophthalmic medical technology company focused on the development and commercialization of breakthrough products and procedures designed to transform the treatment of glaucoma, today announced that Health Canada has approved its iStent inject® Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stent for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients diagnosed with primary open-angle glaucoma, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma or pigmentary glaucoma.   read more  

Is It All in the Genes? - Review of Optometry (March 11, 2013) - Optometrists may one day be able to identify patients at high risk for glaucoma and keratoconus based on their genetic profiles, thanks to a discovery by scientists at the Singapore Eye Research Institute and the Association for Science, Technology and Research's Genome Institute of Singapore.

Early Predictor of Glaucoma Found - Ophthalmology (March 1, 2013) - Patients who had abnormally narrow retinal arteries at the start of a new study were also those who were most likely to have glaucoma at its 10 year end point. Detecting narrowing of the retinal artery diameter could effectively identify those who are most at risk for open-angle glaucoma, providing an early warning.

New Predictor for Glaucoma - Science Daily (January 10, 2013) - A recent study shows that changes in blood vessels in the retina can be an early warning that a person is at risk of developing glaucoma.

Rapid Eye Movements Delayed in Patients with Glaucoma - Science Daily (December 18, 2012) - Rapid eye movements are significantly delayed in people with glaucoma (by about 15%). This could explain why these patients are at increased risk for falls and car accidents.

Glaucoma: An Alternative Treatment to Eye Drops? - American Academy of Ophthalmology (November 26, 2012) - Hydrus, an ultra-small medical device, could significantly reduce eye pressure in glaucoma patients and allow some to stop using eye drop medications, according to year-one clinical trial results presented at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Heavy Coffee Drinkers at Increased Risk of Vision Loss - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (October 15, 2012) - Drinking three cups or more of caffeinated coffee daily increases the risk of developing exfoliation glaucoma, according to a new study.

Scientists Find Genes Associated with Glaucoma - Nature Genetics (September 18, 2012) - Three new genes associated with primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG), a leading cause of blindness in Chinese people, have been identified by Singapore scientists.

The New View on Glaucoma - Ophthalmology (March 20, 2012) - Researchers are making advances in their perception of glaucoma. Long considered soleLy as an eye disease, glaucoma is increasingly viewed as a neurological disorder, which is generating promising treatment solutions.

Be Careful with Calcium and Iron Supplements - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (March 13, 2012) - A recent study suggests that iron and calcium supplements may be associated with the development of glaucoma. Participants 40 years or older, who took daily supplements of more than 800mg of calcium or 18 mg of iron significantly increased their risk of developing glaucoma.

Environment Factors into Risk of Developing Exfoliation Glaucoma - Review of Optometry (February 17, 2012) - Geographical latitude and outside air temperature-not ethnicity-could be potential risk factors for the development of exfoliation syndrome (ES). ES is the leading cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma, and may also contribute to cataract formation.

Glaucomas That Like Cold Weather - Ophthalmology (January 24, 2012) - An American study recently published in Ophthalmology shows that the risk of developing exfoliation glaucoma is greater in the North than in the South.

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Be Active and Reduce the Risk of Developing Glaucoma - Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (November 1, 2011) - A new study published in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science shows a link between physical activity and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), a major risk factor for glaucoma.

Using Cocaine Increases Risk of Glaucoma - Science Daily (October 17, 2011) - In the United States, a study conducted on 5.3 million patients (91% of whom were men) suggests that cocaine use increases the risk of open-angle glaucoma.

Gene Behind Glaucoma Identified - Science Daily (May 31, 2011) - It is a mutation in a gene that causes the eye disease glaucoma, according to collaborative research conducted by Swedish, Tunisian, and American researchers. The findings were recently published in the journal Nature Genetics.   read more  

Retina - Retinitis Pigmentosis (RP) and General (31)

First gene therapy for a blinding eye disease receives FDA approval - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (December 19, 2017) - Today we are celebrating the FDA's pathbreaking approval of Luxturna.   read more  

New Master Control Gene Provides Key Insights into Restoring Vision - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (October 31, 2017) - With support from the FFB community, Dr. Michel Cayouette's research is advancing the field of stem cell therapy in extraordinary ways; it is doing so by illuminating how stem cells are produced, how they turn into other cells, and the role they play in the overall biology of the human eye. Dr. Cayouette's ultimate goal? The transplantation of new cells into individuals living with vision loss, leading, of course, to the restoration of vision.   read more  

Gene Therapy Improves Vision in Landmark Clinical Trial - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (July 14, 2017) - In The Lancet, a prestigious journal, a landmark publication showed that gene therapy can improve vision in people living with a rare blinding eye disease. The study examined the effects of an experimental gene therapy - voretigene neparvovec - to treat an inherited blinding eye disease caused by mutations in the RPE65 gene. RPE65 mutations are one of the genetic mutations that underlie the disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), which causes severe loss of vision at birth or in childhood.   read more  

What you can do about floaters and flashes in the eye - Harvard Health Blog (Updated May 23, 2017) - "Floaters" and flashes are a common sight for many people. Floater is a catchall term for the specks, threads, or cobweb-like images that occasionally drift across the line of vision. Flashes are sparks or strands of light that flicker across the visual field. Both are usually harmless. But they can be a warning sign of trouble in the eye, especially when they suddenly appear or become more plentiful.   read more  

Halting Cell Death to Save Vision - Foundation Fighting Blindness (April 3, 2017) - Many forms of vision loss, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), are a result of the death of cells. In these and similar diseases, the culprit is a specific set of cells housed in the retina called photoreceptors. These cells enable the eye to capture light, and without them vision is lost. The cutting-edge approach being developed in Dr. Monnier's lab involves preventing the death of these precious cells. He and his team are exploring the possibility of halting photoreceptor cell death to save vision.   read more  

The Biology of Treating Blindness with Stem Cells - Foundation Fighting Blindness (March 29, 2017) - Dr. Gilbert Bernier has a plan to cure blindness. He made headlines a few years ago with his tremendously important FFB-funded discovery that uncovered an efficient and effective method to coax stem cells into becoming cone photoreceptors. Since then, he has been fine-tuning his approach in the laboratory with the clear goal of moving toward a clinical trial.   read more  

Prism-Containing Glasses Minimize Peripheral Vision Loss - Info Clip (January 3, 2017) - New eyewear containing prisms can expand the visual field for patients with partial blindness, reducing collisions with other pedestrians, according research from the the Schepens Eye Research Institute at Harvard Medical School.   read more  

Surprising Cell Transplantation Discovery Redirects Race to Restore Sight - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (December 14, 2016) - The FFB answer some of the most frequently asked questions about vision research and emerging treatments.   read more  

Clinical Trial Demonstrates Safety, Benefits of Bionic Eye - Info Clip (June 29, 2015) - The results of the 3-year clinical trial of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system, a "bionic eye" developed by Second Sight Medical Products to return sight to patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa, were published this week in the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The Argus II system transmits images from a camera mounted on the patient's glasses to a device implanted on the retina, allowing the brain to interpret patterns of light.   read more  

A NEW CULPRIT IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY - Info Clip (June 5, 2015) - Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered that the protein ANGPTL4 (Angiopoietin-like 4) contributes to the proliferation of leaky blood vessels in the eye in patients with diabetic retinopathy, leading to a loss of vision and eventually permanent blindness. Laboratory tests showed that when both ANGPTL4 and VEGF were blocked the growth of blood vessels was drastically reduced, indicating that new treatments that target both proteins would be more effective than drugs targeting VEGF alone.   read more  

Health Canda Approves First 'Bionic Eye' - Info Clip (January 19, 2015) - The Argus II is the first retinal prosthesis system of its kind to be approved by Health Canada from Second Sight Medical Products. The "bionic eye" is used for treating outer retinal degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) blindness.   read more  

Dr. Robert Molday to be the first Canadian to receive CNIB Chanchlani Global Vision Research Award - CNIB Canada (November 9, 2016) - The first Canadian to receive this prestigious award, Dr. Molday is a faculty member at the University of British Columbia where he currently holds positions as Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and is the founding Director of the Centre for Macular Research. He is being recognized for his important and fundamental contributions to the field of vision and inherited retinal degenerative diseases.   read more  

Popular antibiotics to carry new warning about retinal detachment- Vancouver Sun (02/03/2016) - Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed for respiratory and urinary infections. They will now carry a warning label after Health Canada completed a second review of reports that some patients using them had suffered retinal detachment.   read more  

CRISPR Gene-editing Technology Repairs Retinitis Pigmentosa in Patient-Derived Stem Cells- Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (January 29, 2016) - The latest discovery using the gene editing tool CRISPR shows that it can repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This is an inherited degenerative eye disease that causes blindness in 1.5 million people around the world. A study published in Scientific Reports, broke new ground because it was the first time that researchers were able to replace a defective gene in stem cells that were derived from a patient's own tissue.   read more  

How Do Stem Cells Become Eye Cells? - Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) Canada (January 26, 2016) - Stem cells have the potential to become any kind of cell. This flexibility is what makes them so intriguing to medical scientists who hope to harness this potential to generate new cell therapies. However, there are two very difficult questions that continue to challenge scientists. First, how do you get stem cells to make the exact cell type that you need, such as a light-sensing photoreceptor? And second, how do you get these new replacement cells to function inside human bodies?   read more  

Waterloo Student Wins $100,000 Grant to Develop Smart Contact Lenses- Info Clip (June 19 2015) - The Thiel Foundation announced last week that its class of 2015 Thiel Fellows includes University of Waterloo student Harry Gandhi, co-founder and CEO of Medella Health, a Canadian start-up which plans to develop glucose-monitoring "smart" contact lenses to aid in diabetes management.   read more  

Researchers Help Save The Sight Of People With Diabetes - Queen's University Belfast (February 14, 2013) - Researchers at Queen's University, in Belfast, Northern Ireland, hope to develop an innovative treatment using stem cells to save the sight of millions of diabetes sufferers.

A Study Recommends Caution with Anti-VEGF Drugs - Journal of Clinical Investigation (October 24, 2012) - Several anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) drugs are already in use in order to fight against cancers and eye disorders such as wet macular degeneration. However, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that a drastic reduction of VEGF activity may do more harm than good.

World's First Bionic Eye Implant is a Success - Review of Optometry (October 3, 2012) - Researchers in Australia made history last month after confirming the first successful "bionic eye" implant in the world. Scientists at Bionic Vision Australia (BVA) surgically implanted a prototype of the bionic eye in 54-year-old Dianne Ashworth, who suffers vision loss due to retinitis pigmentosa.

New Cells Found That Could Help To Treat Blinding Eye Conditions - British Journal for Ophthalmology (September 5, 2012) - Specific cells in the eye called corneal limbal stromal cells have been discovered and could lead to new treatments for eye conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa or wet AMD.

Chemical Temporarily Reverses Blindness in Mouse Model - Review of Ophthalmology (August 8, 2012) - A team of University of California, Berkeley, scientists in collaboration with researchers at the University of Munich and University of Washington in Seattle has discovered a chemical that temporarily restores some vision to blind mice, and is working on an improved compound that may someday allow people with degenerative blindness to see again. The approach could eventually help those with retinitis pigmentosa, as well as age-related macular degeneration. In both diseases, rods and cones die, leaving the eye without functional photoreceptors.

Blacks More Vulnerable to High HbA1c Levels - Annals of Internal Medicine (August 7, 2012) - Blacks are more likely to develop diabetic eye damage at lower blood glucose thresholds than whites, according to a recent study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The results suggest that black people may be more vulnerable than whites to high HbA1c levels.

Avastin Beats Laser Therapy - Archives of Ophthalmology (May 1, 2012) - A recent study published online on the Archives of Ophthalmology website suggests that bevacizumab (Avastin) is more effective than laser therapy in patients with diabetic macular oedema.

Photoreceptor Transplant Restores Vision in Mice - Nature (April 18, 2012) - Scientists from the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology have shown for the first time that transplanting light-sensitive photoreceptors into the eyes of visually impaired mice can restore their vision.   read more  

Retinopathy A Marker for Cognitive Loss - Neurology (March 14, 2012) - Women 65 or older who have even mild retinopathy are more likely to have cognitive decline and related vascular changes in the brain, according to a study led by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco. The findings suggest that a relatively simple eye screening could serve as a marker for cognitive changes related to vascular disease, allowing for early diagnosis and treatment, potentially reducing the progression of cognitive impairment to dementia.

Omega-3 in Combination with Vitamin A Slows Down Retinitis Pigmentosa Progression - Archives of Ophthalmology (February 13, 2012) - A combination of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin A can slow the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in adults, according to a study in the February 13 online edition of Archives of Ophthalmology.

Researchers Develop Gene Therapy That Could Correct a Common Form of Blindness - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (January 23, 2012) - A new gene therapy method developed by University of Florida researchers has the potential to treat a common form of blindness that strikes both youngsters and adults. The technique works by replacing a malfunctioning gene in the eye with a normal working copy that supplies a protein necessary for light-sensitive cells in the eye to function.   read more  

Nanoparticles Help Researchers Deliver Steroids to Retina - Biomaterials (December 13, 2011) - Hitching a ride into the retina on nanoparticles called dendrimers offers a new way to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

Historic First Images of Rod Photoreceptors in the Living Human Eye - ScienceDaily (June 9, 2011) - Scientists have just reported that the tiny light-sensing cells known as rods have been clearly and directly imaged in the living eye for the first time.   read more  

Retina Holds the Key to Better Vision in Deaf People - ScienceDaily (June 2, 2011) - People who are deaf benefit from better vision due to the fact their retinas develop differently, experts at the University of Sheffield have shown.   read more  

New Breakthrough In Use Of Stem Cells For Restoring Vision - ScienceDaily (May 16, 2011) - Scientists from Schepens Eye Research Institute are the first to regenerate large areas of damaged retinas and improve visual function using IPS cells (induced pluripotent stem cells) derived from skin. The results of their study, which is published in PLoS ONE this month, hold great promise for future treatments and cures for diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy and other retinal diseases that affect millions worldwide.   read more  

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